Happy Freedman is joining us for Bike Fit

Posted on July 21, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

This year at Medicine of Cycling Happy Freedman will be presenting on the foot – shoe – pedal interface.  Come find common problems and solutions for your cyclists.  Orthotics, strength, wedges, shoes and more will be covered in this lecture and hands on presentation.

As you might have seen we are doing case studies again this year.   There was overwhelming excitement about the interactive model of learning across disciplines.

Like last year we are asking YOU to bring a case study that you can share in a small group.  Bring whatever data you want to share.  It can be very very detailed with video, pictures, on and off bike evaluation information or just "I saw this client last week who …." What do you usually do with these people?

In the next week or 2 start to capture these clients on paper or in your head and BRING them along.

We look forward to seeing you at the conference and sharing the learning opportunities!

Please share this flyer about Bike Fit!

Announcing Bike Fit 2016 in collaboration with MOCC 2016

Posted on June 7, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

Medicine of Cycling is once again announcing a collaborative effort with the International Bike Fitting Institute (IBFI) to professionalize bike fitting and showcase the skills of those at the top of the industry.

Experts in cycling-specific fields, including fitters and medical professionals working with Pro Tour athletes and teams, will be speaking on a variety of topics, as well as providing hands-on training in managing acute cycling injuries and bike fitting. 

The program is open to all professionals including MDs, paramedics, medical students, NPs, PAs, physical therapists, coaches, bike fitters and soigneurs.

This unique academic symposium is led by Curtis Cramblett PT and serves as the non-partisan platform for information-sharing of valuable content for retail and medical bike fitters alike, with presenters from all fields of expertise. 

Discussions and presentations focus on anatomic and structural understanding, available tools, learning high and low-tech techniques to serve fitters, medical experts, and coaches at every level.

BIKE FIT CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Friday, August 12, 2016 – Bike Fit Conference

8:15 - 9:30 AM ABCs of Fitting: A Demo Fit - Steven Carre

9:30 - 10:15 AM Grand Rounds :  Evaluation and Fitting of the Cyclist a Multidisciplinary Approach - Mark Timmerman, MD; Greg Robidoux, PT; Wade Hall, Fitter

10:15 - 11:15 AM Lower Extremity Overuse Injuries: Evaluation and Fitting a Medical Perspective - Mark Timmerman, MD

11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Cyclist-Centered Fitting: Focusing on your cyclist's goals - Curtis Cramblett, PT, CSCS, CFMT

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 - 2:30 PM When It's Not About the Fit - Brian Adams, PT

2:30 - 3:30 PM Barriers, Accommodations, and Interventions for "Getting Aero"

3:30 - 4:30 PM Case Studies - Participant + Facilitator Led - Bring cases to share and explore with multidisciplinary participants - Multiple Facilitators

Saturday, August 13th, 2016 – Bike Fit Confernece (Hands On/ Practical)

8:00 - 11:00 AM Foot Evaluation and Interventions: On and Off the bike – Greg Robidoux PT

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Moderator-Lead Case Studies - Paraic McGlynn, Lead Fitter Trek Factory Racing, CycloLogic

12:00 PM Break Lunch

1:00 - 4:00 PM Pelvis - Trunk - Core - Greg Choat, Strength and Conditioning Coach / Fitter

Please share this 1 page flyer on Bike Fit 2016 within your groups. We hope to see you there!

Interested in Volunteering for MOCC 2016?

Posted on May 27, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

We are looking for medical students who may want to attend MOCC 2016 as a volunteer. We need help with things like shuttling speakers to and from the airport, picking up coffee and supplies, assisting attendees and speakers and various other tasks. You would be free to be a part of the MOCC audience during down time.

If you are interested in volunteering, please send us an email at medofcycling@gmail.com with your contact information.

Please let us know if you have any questions.

Schedule for Medicine of Cycling Conference 2016

Posted on May 17, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

We are excited to share with you our most updated schedule for MOCC 2016. We're busy finalizing details and hope you are making plans to join us in August!

Here is our current schedule:

SATURDAY, August 13, 2016 – Medicine of Cycling Conference

7:15 AM Registration

MORNING MODERATOR: Aaron Goldberg, MD

7:50 AM Welcome and Introduction

8:00 AM Cardiac Screening in Endurance Athletes -Anne Albers MD

9:00 AM Overtraining and Underperformance.  Combining Sports Medicine and Sports Science– Kevin Sprouse MD

10:00 AM Break

10:10 AM Cardiac Risk of Endurance Training -Anne Albers MD

11:10 AM Medical Coverage of Cycling Events -Keith Borg MD

12:10 PM Lunch

AFTERNOON MODERATOR: Anna Abramson MD

1:30 PM Research Presentations

2:30 PM Unique Sports Medicine Concerns of the Female Cyclist -Gloria Cohen MD

3:30 PM Adjourn (Final instructions about ride Hyatt 4p, dinner Marigold 7p (carpool 630p))

4:00 PM Group ride

7:00 PM Group Dinner – Sunbird Mountain Grill, 230 Point of the Pines Dr

SUNDAY, August 14th, 2016 – Medicine of Cycling Conference

MORNING MODERATOR: Mark Greve MD

7:30 AM Registration

8:00 AM Physical Therapy Bike Fit Accommodations – Greg Robidoux PT

9:00 AM Acute Cycling Injuries or panel discussion on race safety -Mark Greve MD

10:00 AM Break

10:10 AM Cycling Physiology and Physiological Testing– Inigo San Milan PhD

11:10 AM Pulmonary Limiters in Athletic Performance -Michael Ross MD

12:10 PM Break

12:20 PM Protecting Clean Sport: Global Advances in Drug Detection and Deterrence Efforts – Matthew Fedoruk PhD

You can find more information about registration here. Let us know if you have any questions!

The Truth About Cycling and Brain Injuries

Posted on March 11, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

Steve Broglio, Director of Research at Medicine of Cycling was interviewed by Bicycle Magazine about the potential of cycling related concussion leading to Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). Symptoms of CTE generally begin 8–10 years after experiencing repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.  In the early stages, CTE can cause decreased job performance, dizziness, and headaches. With progressive deterioration, symptoms may include memory loss, social instability, erratic behavior, and poor judgment.  As the disease progresses, symptoms include dementia, decreased muscle coordination and muscular slowing, stuttering speech, tremors, hearing loss, and suicidality.

CTE has been linked to suicide among athletes in high frequency impact sports, most famously American Football.  As of December 2012, thirty-three former National Football League (NFL) players had been diagnosed with CTE by post-mortem brain autopsy. Famous football players diagnosed post-mortem include Detroit Lions lineman Lou Creekmur, former Houston Oilers and Miami Dolphins linebacker John Grimsley, and former Tampa Bay Buccaneers guard Tom McHale.  An autopsy conducted in 2010 on the brain of Owen Thomas, a 21-year-old junior lineman at the University of Pennsylvania who committed suicide, showed early stages of CTE.  He is one of the youngest to be diagnosed with this condition.

Read the full article here: http://www.bicycling.com/training/health-injuries/the-truth-about-cycling-and-brain-injuries

Registration open for MOCC 2016

Posted on February 19, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

Registration is now open for the annual Medicine of Cycling Conference August 12 - 14, 2016 at the USA Cycling National Conference Center in Colorado Springs. We are pleased to announce fee reductions for this year. CME and CUE credits available. There is an exciting line up of speakers. UCSF is once again the CME sponsor for the event. Use this link to register now:

http://www.ucsfcme.com/2017/MMJ17002/info.html

There are 3 option under the Registration Type. The first is for physicians registering for the main conference the second for everyone else registering for the main conference. The third option is for those who want to do the 2 day hands on fit course and conclude with a single day of the main conference.

Here is a tentative schedule for the Medicine of Cycling Conference:

SATURDAY, August 13, 2016 – Medicine of Cycling Conference

7:15 AM Registration

MORNING MODERATOR: Aaron Goldberg, MD

7:50 AM Welcome and Introduction

8:00 AM Cardiac Screening in Endurance Athletes -Anne Albers MD

9:00 AM Medical Complications due to Training and Overtraining – Kevin Sprouse MD

10:00 AM Break

10:10 AM Cardiac Risk of Endurance Training -Anne Albers MD

11:10 AM Rehab and Recovery from Injury -David Castol MD

12:10 PM Lunch

AFTERNOON MODERATOR: Anna Abramson MD

1:30 PM Research Presentations

2:30 PM The Female Cyclist -Gloria Cohen MD

3:30 PM Adjourn (Final instructions about ride Hyatt 4p, dinner Marigold 7p (carpool 630p))

4:00 PM Group ride

7:00 PM Group Dinner – Marigold Cafe and Bakery – 4605 Centennial Blvd., Colorado Springs

SUNDAY, August 14th, 2016 – Medicine of Cycling Conference

MORNING MODERATOR: Mark Greve MD

7:30 AM Registration

8:00 AM Physical Therapy Bike Fit Accommodations – Greg Robidoux PT

900 AM  Acute Cycling Injuries or panel discussion on race safety -Mark Greve MD

10:00 AM Break

10:10 AM Cycling Physiology and Physiological Testing– Inigo San Milan PhD

11:10 AM Pulmonary Limiters in Athletic Performance -Michael Ross MD

12:10 PM Break

12:20 PM Protecting Clean Sport: Global Advances in Drug Detection and Deterrence Efforts – Matthew Fedoruk PhD

1:20 PM Adjourn

Let us know if you have any questions or comments!

Call For Abstracts for 2016 Medicine of Cycling Conference

Posted on January 29, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS FOR 2016 MEDICINE OF CYCLING CONFERENCE

We are pleased to announce the call for Abstracts for the 2016 Medicine of Cycling Conference, to be held August 12-14, 2016 in Colorado Springs, CO.  Our goal is to provide a forum where researchers and clinicians can disseminate research and clinical case studies. If you are a researcher or clinician and are interested in presenting original research or a case reports at our conference, we invite you to submit your original research papers now through April 15th, 2016.

We encourage abstract submissions in a variety of areas, however, all submissions must be relevant to cycling medicine.  Both quantitative (including data) and qualitative (program descriptions, educational interventions, etc) are acceptable, however previously published data will not be accepted.  Submitted abstracts will be reviewed for relevance and quality, and highly ranked abstracts will be invited to give a podium presentation (10-minute presentation followed by a 5-minute Q&A).  Some abstracts may be invited to provide a poster presentation.  Research presentations are likely to occur on August 13th.

Guidelines

Original Research

Abstracts must be no longer than 450 words and should be structured as follows:

Title

Author(s)* full names, degrees and affiliation. 

Context: Write a sentence or two summarizing the rationale for the study, providing a reason for the study question and/or uniqueness of study. Objective: State the precise objective(s) or question(s) addressed in the report, including a priori hypotheses if applicable. Design: Describe the overall study design of the project reported (e.g., randomized controlled trial, crossover trial, cohort or cross-sectional). Setting: Describe the environment in which the study was conducted to help readers understand the transferability of the findings, (e.g., patient clinic, research laboratory or field). Patients or Other Participants: Describe the underlying target population, selection procedures (e.g., population based sample, volunteer sample or convenience sample) and important aspects of the final subject pool (e.g., number, average age, weight, height and measures of variance, years of experience or gender). Interventions: Interventions are the independent variables in the study. Describe the essential pieces of the experimental methods, types of materials, measurements and instrumentation utilized, data analysis procedures and statistical tests employed. Main Outcome Measures: Clearly identify primary or critical dependent variables that support the primary objective(s) of the study. Indicate the statistical analysis employed to answer the primary research objective(s). Results: The main results of the study should be given: When appropriate, include descriptive data (e.g., proportions, means, rates, odds ratios or correlations), accompanying measures of dispersion (e.g., ranges, standard deviations or confidence intervals) and inferential statistical data. Results should be accompanied by the level of statistical significance (ie p-value). Conclusions: Summarize or emphasize the new and important findings of the study. The conclusion must be consistent with the study objectives and results as reported. If possible, relate implications of the findings to the medicine of cycling.

*Authors of accepted abstracts will be asked to disclose funding sources and potential conflicts of interests.

Case Reports

Abstracts must be no longer than 600 words and should be structured as follows:

Title

Author(s)* full names, degrees and affiliation. 

Background: Include the individual’s age, sex, sport discipline, pertinent aspects of their medical history, a brief history of their complaint and physical findings from the examination. Differential Diagnosis: Include all possible diagnoses suspected based on the history, mechanism of injury, and the initial clinical examination. Treatment: Include the physician’s evaluation and state the results of diagnostic imaging and laboratory results if performed. The final diagnosis of the injury or condition and subsequent treatment and clinical course followed should be clearly detailed. Relevant and unique details should be included, as well as the final outcome of the case. Uniqueness: Briefly describe the uniqueness of this case such as its mechanism, incidence rate, evaluate findings, rehabilitation, or predisposing factors. Conclusions: Include a concise summary of the case as reported and highlight the case’s importance to the medicine of cycling and provide the reader with a clinical learning opportunity. 

*Authors of accepted abstracts will be asked to disclose funding sources and potential conflicts of interests.

Submission Information and Deadlines

Abstracts should be submitted via email to Medicine of Cycling at medofcycling @ gmail.com

Abstract Submission Deadline:  April 15th, 2016

Abstract Acceptance/Non-acceptance email notifications: May 15th, 2015

Awards

The following prizes will be awarded:

1 Best Student/Resident/Fellow Original Research Abstract Award: waived conference fee

1 Best Student/Resident/Fellow Case Report Award: waived conference fee

1 Best Professional Original Research or Case Report Abstract: waived conference fee

The waived conference fee is contingent upon presenting at the conference.

We look forward to your submissions!

 

Sincerely,

Medicine of Cycling Research Task Force

Articles on Road Rash and Head Injuries from MOCC 2015 Participant, Paul Engler RN

Posted on January 6, 2016 by Courtney Barnes

One of our very own MOCC 2015 participants, Paul Engler, RN has recently had two articles published in Performance Conditioning: Cycling's newsletters.

You can read them here:

Head Injuries from Medicine of Cycling Conference

Dealing with Road Rash from Medicine of Cycling Conference

Please share with your cycling community!

Medicine of Cycling Concussion Cards now in Japanese!

Posted on October 2, 2015 by Courtney Barnes

We are thrilled that Medicine of Cycling is becoming a part of cycling communities all over the world! Dr. Kiyonori Tomiwa has kindly translated our concussion cards to be a reference for the Japanese cycling community.

You can find the Japanese translated card here.

Road rash care: Cycling bravery has some consequences, but nothing a little post-bike ride wound care can’t fix

Posted on September 25, 2015 by Courtney Barnes

Medicine of Cycling: Road Rash

*originally published on LifeBalance

By Paul Engler, RN, BSN

Cycling has many health benefits. However, there is always a risk of injury or medical issues. As a cyclist, a nurse and event volunteer, I find myself helping injured cyclists, doing medical assessments and giving treatment. I wanted a new resource to educate myself on injuries, prevention, improving care and educating the public. My solution was to attend the yearly conference in Colorado Springs presented by Medicine of Cycling™. It turned out to be wonderful resource for medical professionals who are involved in the sport. The Medicine of Cycling™ mission is prevention of crashes with injuries and rehabilitation with performance to help cyclists across the country get better care and help them achieve their goals.

This organization is affiliated with USA Cycling and is made up of a panel of sports doctors from around the country and teaching universities. Professional team doctors from Cannondale Garmin and Team Type 1 sit on the panel and were present and ran lab simulation. They were excellent teachers and presenters. If you’re a bicycle racer, USA Cycling would be familiar as the organizing and sanctioning body for bicycle racing in the United States. MOC looks at evidence-based research and methods to treat or prevent cycling related medical problems. This year’s focus covered a number of areas with experts across the nations. If you are wanting to know more, see the MOC website http://www.medicineofcycling.com/.

This is the first of a few articles on what I learned at MOC and I hope you find interesting and useful. I shall keep them brief and to the point and start with the least serious to the most serious injuries to follow in the coming months. Most crashes will have abrasions or lacerations. Studies at the this conference showed around 60-70% of all injuries from the skinned knee of a child to the full body road rash of the back, shoulder, hip and knee of the crit racer. “Road rash” is the common term and the most common injury, and is very painful.

Event planners  such as race directors or large ride leaders can stock up their first aid kits. Clubs and race teams should keep a well-stocked first aid kit in their trailers. It’s a nice service to add to a rider’s membership. Also make sure they are covered under the club’s or USAC insurance policy and get the paperwork filled out. It’s best to buy supplies on online as the selection is greater and the cost is affordable. A formal medical plan should be part of your event to respond and treat injured cyclists.

Road Rash Treatment
This is assuming bumps and bruises with minor swelling, no fractures, lacerations or head injuries which have been well ruled out. If you have more serious injuries, road rash issues are the least of your worries. If any doubts have them driven to urgent care or activate EMS.

1. Dirty wound with possible contamination? Gravel, glass, cow poop (this happened in the Dirty Kanza gravel ride this year leading to secondary infection) or wet, slippery, muddy conditions increase the risk for infections. Elbows and knees are more at risk as the organism will get inside  the bursa of the joint where it can grow and is not easily washed out. Go to step 2 for a dirty wound. If NOT, skip 2. and go to step 3. Hydrogen Peroxide is very good at killing germs but it kills live tissue as well so you need to use good judgment.

cowdungwound

For a cow poop wound while on gravel or trail, scrub the wound bed really well. Mountain Bikers get into dirt and rocks. Goose poop may be found on lake trails. With wet, slippery, or muddy pavement, a cyclist will lose traction and fall down.

2. A. Irrigate with normal saline or store bought bottled water. Normal saline reduces some of the sting while washing out a wound.

B. Use sterile scrub brush with hydrogen peroxide and scrub out wound and remove all foreign bodies.

A medical sterile scrub brush is used to get the grit out.

Hate to say it but it’s going to hurt a lot. However, a $1500.00 day hospital bill while they treat you for infection for not cleaning out the wound properly is going to hurt more. If you cannot get all the crud out, go to the ER as they have tools such as VERSAJET hydro-surgery system which enables a surgeon to precisely select, excise and evacuate nonviable tissue, bacteria and contaminants from wounds and soft tissue injuries. Stronger anti-infectives and antibiotics can be prescribed with sedation to reduce the pain of the procedure.

4. Pat the wound dry and use triple antibiotic cream, then a
non-stick bandage such as Tegaderm. This provides a good barrier and healing environment. You can buy BSN Tegaderm on the internet in rolls to place in club or first aid bags.

5. For the second layer, apply a tegaderm4×4 gauze over Tegaderm as padding and base for final compression layer.

6. Compression bandages are used to hold the bandage in place. Shoulders, elbows and knees are hard areas to hold the bandage in place. Cover-Roll® Stretch is good product to use on shoulders as well as general areas of the forearm. Coban can be used as well. These products come in rolls to be cut to length and can be kept in first aid bags. Cover-Roll® Stretch runs about $10-$14 dollars a roll. The sock or tube bandages are very nice too. Either place over the CoverRoll or over the gauze as shown below.

coverrollforearmcover

Removal is done in the shower. The bandage will fall off easier with minimal sticking to the wound causing less discomfort. Wash the wound out gently and with shower water and then allow drying and re-bandaging starting with step 4 above.

Signs of infection include increased pain with swelling redness or streaking, yellow or white drainage, or not healing. Go to urgent care or doctor for assessment. Crashing in wet conditions increase the risk for secondary infection on knees and elbows. Infection may lead to hospital admission so it’s good to catch early. If you are a race or event director, send extra bandages in a plastic bag with the person to take home till they can get to the drug store or their doctor.

~~~
Paul Engler, BSN, RN has been working in medicine for 25 years. A cyclist for more than 30 years, he has enjoyed riding for recreation, racing, and gravel grinding. Paul is a member of the Lawrence Bike Club, Kaw Valley Bike Club, Medicine Of Cycling, and USA Cycling.